Thrive Themes child themes are one of the easiest child themes to setup. You don't need to enqueue scripts like some of the other theme companies require, just properly reference the parent theme in the style.css file and you're good to go. Here's an older example of enqueuing scripts in a Thrive Child Theme in case you're interested in referencing.

Join me as we go through general child theme setup advice in today's highlight of Thrive Themes.

Child Theme Setup

  1. Create a child theme folder. Name it with the theme name and end it with -child. If you're using FocusBlog for example, name the folder focusblog-child.
  2. Copy original theme screenshot or save the desired theme screenshot below with the child theme banner as screenshot.jpg.
  3. Create a style.css file. This is required. See below for quick copy and paste action.
  4. Create a functions.php file. This is required, even if the file is empty. See below for quick copy and paste action.

FocusBlog

Thrive Themes FocusBlog Theme Screenshot

FocusBlog Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

FocusBlog CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: FocusBlog Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: FocusBlog Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: focusblog
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: focusblog-child
*/

Ignition

Thrive Themes Ignition Theme Screenshot

Ignition Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Ignition CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Ignition Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Ignition Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: ignition
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: ignition-child
*/

Luxe

Thrive Themes Luxe Theme Screenshot

Luxe Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Luxe CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Luxe Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Luxe Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: luxe
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: luxe-child
*/

Minus

Thrive Themes Minus Theme Screenshot

Minus Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Minus CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Minus Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Minus Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: minus
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: minus-child
*/

Performag

Thrive Themes Performag Theme Screenshot

Performag Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Performag CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Performag Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Performag Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: performag
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: performag-child
*/

Pressive

Thrive Themes Pressive Theme Screenshot

Pressive Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Pressive CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Pressive Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Pressive Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: pressive
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: pressive-child
*/

Rise

Thrive Themes Rise Theme Screenshot

Rise Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Rise CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Rise Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Rise Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: rise
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: rise-child
*/

Squared

Thrive Themes Squared Theme Screenshot

Squared Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Squared CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Squared Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Squared Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: squared
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: squared-child
*/

Storied

Thrive Themes Storied Theme Screenshot

Storied Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Storied CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Storied Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Storied Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: storied
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: storied-child
*/

Voice

Thrive Themes Voice Theme Screenshot

Voice Functions

Save to functions.php. It's ok for this file to be empty like it's shown below. You just need this file present in the directory.

<?php

?>

Voice CSS

Save to style.css.

/*
Theme Name: Voice Child
Theme URI: https://websitejolt.com
Description: Voice Child Theme
Author: Website Jolt
Author URI: https://websitejolt.com
Template: voice
Version: 1.0.0
Text Domain: voice-child
*/

Editing Page Templates

Another good reason for setting up a child theme (for any theme) is to make fun customizations or fixes the developers won't do. For example, the updated post time is inconsistently implemented across all Thrive Themes. Some allow for updated post times in the theme options and some don't. I've seen people in the support forum ask support to fix this and they won't add it in and will not help implement patches.

So now you have to edit a page template in order to get an updated post time in your theme that doesn't currently support it. Thrive Themes does a good job explaining this process in their New Page Template Knowledge Base article. In this example, you start by copying the content-single.php file from the original theme and pasting it in the root of the child theme folder. Then you find the block of code you want to edit and change it. Here's what I had to either show the published date or updated post date:

<?php if ( isset( $options['meta_post_date'] ) && $options['meta_post_date'] == 1 ): ?>
  <?php if ( $options['relative_time'] == 1 ): ?>
    <?php echo thrive_human_time( get_the_time( 'U' ) ); ?>
  <?php else: ?>
    <?php $u_time = get_the_time('U'); 
    $u_modified_time = get_the_modified_date('U'); 
    if ($u_modified_time >= $u_time + 86400) { 
    echo "Last updated on "; 
    the_modified_time('F jS, Y'); } ?>
    <?php //echo get_the_date(); ?>
  <?php endif; ?>
<?php endif; ?>

Even though I'm showing the snippet that has changed here, you still need the rest of the code in its entirety if you expect the template to remain the same. This isn't like how CSS only requires the property being changed.

This is just one example. You can do all kinds of cool stuff in child themes. I mostly stick to tweaking themes and adding custom functions.

A word of caution – I'm not sure if the above snippet still works so if you decide to use it, do so at your own risk.

Thrive Themes No Longer For Sale

Update 4/19: These 10 themes are no longer for sale, making Thrive Themes ironically themeless in their product offering. Yes, they have Thrive Architect which is really nice (one of my favorite page builders), but that's hardly a theme replacement. Go to a category page or blog post with Thrive Architect published pages and you'll see what I mean.

They are making a theme builder named Thrive Theme Builder (surprise!) that will close the gaps that Thrive Architect has. They are in advanced Beta testing so I look forward in giving it a try in 2021. I kid, but development on this update has gone on for quite a while, with nearly a year passing since they announced it. This will be for the better, as the Thrive Themes of old had a lot of issues. Speaking of which, they have committed to keeping the old Thrive Themes updated a year after public release of the new Theme Builder.

“We’ll support our old themes for at least 1 year after the public release of Theme Builder which means you won’t be left with an outdated website any time soon.”

Support in this case means minimal viable security fixes and compatibility fixes. Don't expect new features or some of the old nagging issues to be fixed (like how some of the themes don't apply the Style Settings correctly or correctly display updated publish times). Check out the Thrive Themes Changelog for a chronological list of updates in order to make sure you have the most recent version. This is very cool. I wish more WordPress developers did this, even though Thrive Themes doesn't always include the changes in the announcements.

When the year of support is up after the Theme Builder release, it doesn't mean your theme will immediately stop working. It just means that they won't put any more work into the old themes, meaning you won't get any security updates, code improvements, and guaranteed compatibility with future versions of WordPress. You will need to get off these themes at some point, preferably before you have to. I made this conversion already for Website Jolt. I was running the Minus Theme and now I'm happily on Divi. It was a ton of work so make sure you properly plan your transition.

Conclusion

That's it, nothing to it. Make sure you have the parent theme installed before you try to activate the child theme. Let me know how you usually setup your Thrive Themes child themes by commenting below.

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